Jupiter’s Moons

 

 

I have great fondness for Jupiter’s moons. Allow me to explain why…

 

You see, It was in 1610 that Galileo Galilei discovered Jupiter’s moons with his freshly invented telescope. Observing moons orbiting something other than the Earth gave Galileo the evidence he needed to discredit the current world view that the Earth was the centre of the universe. 

 

Now this did not go down well with the pope. 

 

He denounced Galileo’s findings as “False news”, declared him an “Enemy of the state”, and demanded the church “Lock him up”. He refused to allow evidence to change his falsely held beliefs, and dismissed such as fake.

 

What’s that dear readers? You have a couple of questions?

 

Firstly, interesting thought this astronomy history and thinly veiled socio-political satire is, what the flip does it have to do with magic?

 

Secondly, who is that woman in the picture? I’m fairly certain she’s neither Galileo, the pope, or a moon of Jupiter.

 

Good points, well made. Allow me to elaborate.

 

That woman is poet Maya Angelou. And this is one of her more famous quotes. 

 

I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel

 

And that is why I love Jupiter’s moons. 

 

You see, I can remember so clearly looking through a telescope and seeing Jupiter’s moons. 

 

I can’t recall which way up they were. How many were at each side of Jupiter. Or what I said when I saw them.

 

But I can remember how they made me feel:

Awestruck, captivated, and breathlessly excited.

And I’ll never forget that.

 

Which finally brings me back to magic…

 

You see, I very much doubt that anyone who sees me do a magic trick will recall the exact details of the plot. They’ll probably forget the (engaging and witty) patter that goes with it. 

 

But maybe someday they might find the souvenir playing card with their initials on it, and they may recall how the magic made them feel. 

 

And if it was awestruck, captivated, and breathlessly excited, I’d be very happy indeed.